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  • D. Hunter

Call out for Submissions

Everyone’s got a different way to describe us, measure us, frame us. Sometimes it's economics, sometimes it’s cultural, sometimes it's whim and folly. Sometimes we’re told we don’t exist anymore, sometimes we’re everybody apart from twelve capitalist ghouls. Some people spot us by the way we speak, the hats we wear, the jobs we have. Some people spot us by our smell, our psychology, our scintillating banter. We are the poor and working class. And Lumpen is a journal for our words and pictures, our thoughts, and our ideas.


Lumpen is for first time writers, and those who write words that pay the bills. Lumpen is always looking out for new writers who hear the words “poor and working class” and say “yep, that’s me”. We want writing that digs past the sloganeering, the easily reducible. We want writing that gets messy and complicated, that digs a little deeper, because there isn’t anything deeper than the minds of the poor and working class. Whether it’s introspection or taking on the big questions of the day. We want writing that gets the pulses going and the sweat glands working.


Our next deadline is 10th May, and the one after that is 10th September. Poetry or prose, fiction or theory, reports or reviews, all of it’s welcomed. If you’ve got any questions you can reach us at: info@theclassworkproject.com


We encourage you have a read of this, so you know how to submit. As ever we pay for all writing that we published https://www.theclassworkproject.com/how-to-submit

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